How do I store copepods?

How do I store copepods?


While we strongly encourage you to introduce all of your copepods into your system when you acquire them as this will be a healthier option than storing, we understand sometimes the circumstances may not allow that and so in this article we'll be explaining what the best steps to take are for storing your pods!


First and foremost, copepods should be kept at room temperature and not placed in your refrigerator!  Copepods can only be stored at temperatures as low as approximately 55 degrees, which is well above your standard kitchen refrigerator.

If you are in need of storing your copepods for 48 hours or less, then all you will need to do is keep them somewhere at room temperature.  No additional action is required! 

If you are storing your copepods for more than 48 hours, you will want to either remove the lid (including the plastic film) or poke holes in it.  You should also swirl the jar daily so as to introduce fresh air into the jar or you may use an aerator if you have one.  You will also need to feed your copepods every 2-3 days with just a couple of drops of Oceanmagik.  Again, you will want to make sure to store your copepods at room temperature.

With proper procedures followed, your copepods may be stored for up to 3 weeks in total.  As previously mentioned, though, it is always best to introduce your copepods into your system as soon as possible, as you will experience much less loss of your copepods than if you choose to store them.    



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